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spaceforawesome:

The swedish cover of The Fault in Our Stars; Förr eller senare exploderar jag.

I-, I just-, I don’t-… what?!

I realize that I am in the minority here, but:

I f*&^ing love the Swedish cover of TFiOS (which they have completely retitled). It’s like my YA cancer novel has been turned into crazy pulp fiction from the 1930s.

Also, are they going to keep all the Swedish hip hop references? Are they going to keep, “Of course you don’t speak Swedish. Neither do I. Who the hell speaks Swedish?” ONE CAN ONLY HOPE.

SUPER AWESOME AMAZING. This is the cover and title that Augustus Waters would have picked if he could have. It depicts their lives as epic and big. The title reflect’s Hazel’s frank outlook and language, and paired with the graphic it marries perfectly with Gus’s obsession with THE PRICE OF DAWN. The cover uses a completely different design language than that which you see on the shelves today. Complete success. Daring design, and I hope it’s a hit. Those savvy Swedes…

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Hooray! A really good book is now available to the public!

fishingboatproceeds:

It’s midnight here on the east coast of the US, meaning that The Fault in Our Stars is officially a thing that exists in the world.
I hope you guys enjoy the book and force your friends and family to buy it and whatnot, but mostly I just want to say thank you. On so many levels, I could never have finished this book without the support and goodwill of the nerdfighter community, and also without the hugely fulfilling and encouraging intellectual engagement we share, whether it’s conversations with Vi Hart about the structure of the universe or reading comments about the merits of cable TV. So thank you, and thanks for reading.
You can get The Fault in Our Stars at Amazon, on your electronic reading device, at your local independent bookstore, or wherever books are sold. 

Hooray! A really good book is now available to the public!

fishingboatproceeds:

It’s midnight here on the east coast of the US, meaning that The Fault in Our Stars is officially a thing that exists in the world.

I hope you guys enjoy the book and force your friends and family to buy it and whatnot, but mostly I just want to say thank you. On so many levels, I could never have finished this book without the support and goodwill of the nerdfighter community, and also without the hugely fulfilling and encouraging intellectual engagement we share, whether it’s conversations with Vi Hart about the structure of the universe or reading comments about the merits of cable TV. So thank you, and thanks for reading.

You can get The Fault in Our Stars at Amazon, on your electronic reading device, at your local independent bookstore, or wherever books are sold. 

Why I like this cover

Hi folks,

I thought I’d take a minute to let you know why I think the cover design for John’s new book The Fault in our Stars is brilliant. I am almost as dismayed by the negative responses to the cover as I was impressed by the amazingly wonderful designs submitted by many of you earlier this year. While I respect that aesthetic judgments are highly subjective, there are several reasons why this cover design is strong and that you should like it:

1) Simple is good. The forms and type treatment on the cover are easily distinguishable, but their symbolic meaning is less so. The complexity and sophistication of the black and white inverted cloud design reveals itself gradually upon consideration of the text—exactly what a successful book cover should do. Having been lucky enough read it, I can tell you that the book is intricate, challenging, simultaneously funny and tragic, and demanding of much more than an overly literal or sentimental graphic representation. Some of the best works of art are simple gestures, basic designs, and concepts that seem so obvious you wonder why no one did it before (ahem, all Apple products). But no one did do it before.  It takes a talented designer to have the wisdom to use a simple, elegant design with confidence and purpose.

2) The cover does not have literal references to people, places, or things in the book. When a book cover has a photograph or illustration of a person or setting in the book (or—worst of all—the movie poster regurgitated into the cover), I am deprived of one of my most prized joys as a reader: the privilege of envisioning the people and places as described in the book through the filter of my own experience and imagination. When I am forced to conjure character X as a Hollywood actress or teen model, it makes me angry. Let me do my job!

3) The design is bold, graphic, and immediately readable. In the age of our dependence on miniscule digital thumbnails to sell a book, such a bright and highly contrasting design will undoubtedly capture the eye whether browsing in an analog bookstore or scrolling through suggested titles on your e-reader.

4) This cover design embraces the ambiguity inherent in life, in this novel, and in the many ways that we grapple with life through art. It does not condescend. It does not spoon feed. It makes you think. And I like to think.

Finally: Must I really invoke the old adage about judging a book by its cover? I am breaking my steadfast mantra to John about not indulging negative criticism, but I felt compelled to express my opinion. Let’s wait until it comes out, read it, and then have a discussion. I’ll look forward to it.